2016 SCDTSEA Conference

The 2016 SCDTSEA Conference will be held on Friday, November 18, 2016 in Blythewood, SC at the SCDMV Building. The theme will be Distracted Driving

Click here to download the conference registration form
Click here to download an SCDTSEA membership application
Click here to download the conference poster contest details
Click here to download the conference schedule

Schedule:

Time Event
07:15 a.m. – 08:00 a.m. Exhibitors/Vendors set-up
07:30 a.m. – 08:30 a.m. Registration & Visiting Exhibits
08:30 a.m. – 08:45 a.m. Welcome, Invocation & Pledge of Allegiance
Presiding Officer: David Smith, President, SCDTSEA
Dr. Albert Neal, Chaplain, SCDTSEA
Ms. Dixie McNair, Board Member, SCDTSEA
08:45 a.m. – 09:00 a.m. Greetings
Mr. Karl McClary, Inspector General, SCDMV
09:00 a.m. – 09:30 a.m. Business Meeting, part 1
Election of SCDTSEA Officers & Board Members: Mr. Andrew Johnson, President Elect, SCDTSEA
Installation of Officers: Dr. Albert Neal, Chaplain
09:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Parents Role in Driver Education/Training
Andy Pilgrim, Expert, Driver Trainer
10:15 a.m. – 10:25 a.m. Break: Visit Exhibits and Check Door Prizes Booth
10:25 a.m. – 10:55 a.m. Tips/Reminders For Driver Education Teachers
Dr. Harry Stille, Driver Education Professor, Erskine College, Due West, SC
10:55 a.m. – 11:10 a.m. Awards & Presentation
Mr. David Smith, President, SCDTSEA
11:10 a.m. – 11:40 a.m. Respecting Motorists: Automobiles and Motor Cycles
Mr. Bill Rhyne, Safety Officer, SC
11:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Role of SC Transport Police Regarding Commercial Vehicles
Lieutenant Roy Cloud/ Corporal Cato, SC Department of Transport Police
12:20 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Realities of Driving on the Highway Transportation System (HTS)
Mr. Andy Pilgrim, Expert Driver Trainer
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Lunch, Visit Exhibits and Check Door Prizes Booth
2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. Poster Contest Results
Mrs. Janice Cowen, State Coordinator, Operation Life Saver
Mr. Eric Robertson, Vendor/Exhibitor, Greenfield, IN
2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Business Meeting, part 2
Secretary’s Report: Mr. Jerry Lloyd, Secretary
Treasurer’s Report: Dr. Harry Stille, Treasurer
2:30 p.m. – 2:40 p.m. Closing Remarks
President, Mr. David Smith
President Elect, Mr. Andrew Johnson

Parent-Teen Driving Agreements

This post contains links to some parent/teen driving agreements.

Click here to view an agreement created by the Allstate Foundation.

Click here to view an agreement written by Doreen Haughton-James of www.123DriveDrivingAcademy.com.

Click here to view an agreement written by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Click here to view the parent-teen agreement used by AAA Carolinas.

Click here to view the family agreement used by Sabbadino Driving School.

SCDTSEA Driver and Traffic Safety Teacher’s Creed

We, the driver educators of South Carolina, do hereby dedicate our personal and professional efforts as teachers:

  • To effectively alert our students of the increasing hazards of operation a motor vehicle
  • To increase the decision-making skills of our students, relative to the effects of alcohol, drugs, and the student’s individual value system
  • To instill the traits of character that should make one a safe driver and good traffic citizen, such as respect for the rights of other drivers, obedience to laws and maintaining self-control
  • To keep abreast of changes in the field of driver education and traffic safety
  • To be constantly aware of the physical, mental, and emotional health and growth of our students
  • To work as a team in respecting the rights, the integrity, and the dignity of our fellow educators
  • To keep ever in mind our common goal to reduce the accidents and fatalities in our cities, state, and nation.

Oh, Please God, I’m only 17!

(Dear Abby)…If the column today is macabre or depressing, I apologize to those of you who look to me for a laugh. But I was deeply moved by a Kalamazoo teenager who asked me to reprint this fantasy which appeared in the Tiger Tattler, the school paper of Lawrence.

IN LOVE WITH LIFE — OR HOW IT WOULD BE IF I WERE KILLED IN AN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT:

Agony claws my mind. I am a statistic. When I first got here I felt very much alone. I was overwhelmed with grief and I expected to find sympathy.

The day I died was an ordinary school day. How I wish I had taken the bus! But I was too cool for the bus. I remember how I wheedled the car out of Mom. “Special favor,” I pleaded, “All the kids drive.” When the 2:50 bell rang I threw my books in the locker. I was free until 8:40 tomorrow morning! I ran to the parking lot — excited at the thought of driving a car and being my own boss. Free!

It doesn’t matter how this accident happened. I was goofing off — going too fast. Taking crazy chances. But I was enjoying my freedom and having fun. The last thing I remember was passing an old lady who seemed to be going awfully slow. I heard a deafening crash and felt a terrible jolt. Glass and steel flew everywhere. My whole body seemed to be turning inside out. I heard myself scream.

Suddenly I awakened. It was very quiet. A police officer was standing over me. Then I saw a doctor. My body was mangled. I was saturated with blood. Pieces of jagged glass were sticking out all over. Strange that I couldn’t feel anything. Hey, don’t pull that sheet over my head. I can’t be dead. I’m only 17. I’ve got a date tonight. I’m suppose to grow up and have a wonderful life. I haven’t lived yet. I can’t be dead.

Later I was placed in a drawer. My folks had to identify me. Why did they have to see me like this: Why did I have to look at Mom’s eyes when she faced the most terrible ordeal of her life? Dad suddenly looked like an old man. He told the man in charge, “Yes — he is our son.”

The funeral was a weird experience. I saw all my relatives and friends walk toward the casket. They passed by, one by one, and looked at me with the saddest eyes I’ve ever seen. Some of my buddies were crying. A few of the girls touched my hand and sobbed as they walked away.

Please — somebody — wake me up! Get me out of here. I can’t bear to see my Mom and Dad so broken up. My grandparents are so racked with grief they can barely walk. My brother and sister are like zombies. They move like robots. In a daze. Everybody, No one can believe this. And I can’t believe it either.

Please don’t bury me! I’m not dead! I have a lot of living to do! I want to laugh and run again. I want to sing and dance. Please don’t put me in the ground. I promise if You give me just one more chance, God, I’ll be the most careful driver in the whole world. All I want is one more chance. Please, God, I’m only 17.

How Fast Can You Die?

A study from a research safety center shares what happens when a car traveling 55 miles an hour crashes into a solid immovable object (without a seat belt on):

1/10th of a second: The front bumper and chrome “frosting” of the grillwork collapse. Slivers of steel penetrate the object to a depth of 1 1/2 inches.

2/10ths of a second: The hood rises, crumples, smashes into the windshield. Spinning rear wheels leave the ground. The fenders come into contact with the object, forcing the rear parts out over the front doors. The driver’s body continues to move forward at the vehicle’s original speed. At 20 times the normal force of gravity his body weighs 3000 pounds. His legs ramrod straight and snap at the knee joints.

3/10ths of a second: The driver’s body is now off the seat, torso upright, broken knees pressed against the dashboard. The plastic and steel frame of the steering wheel begins to bend under his terrible death grip. His head is now near the sun visor, his chest above the steering column.

4/10ths of a second: The car’s front 24 inches have been demolished, but the rear end is still traveling about 35 miles per hour. The driver’s body is still traveling 55 miles per hour. The half-ton motor block crunches into the object hit.

5/10ths of a second: The driver’s fear-frozen hands bend the steering column into an almost vertical position. The force of gravity impales him on the steering shaft. Jagged steel punctures lung and intercostals arties. Blood spurts into his lungs.

6/10ths of a second: The driver’s feet are ripped from his tightly laced shoes. The brake pedal shears off the floor boards. The chassis bends in the middle, shearing body bolts. The driver’s head smashes into the windshield. The rear of the car begins its downward fall, spinning wheels digging into the ground.

7/10ths of a second: The entire writhing body of the car is forced out of shape. Hinges tear, doors spring open. In one last convulsion the seats ram forward pinning the driver against the cruel steel of the steering shaft. Blood leaps from his mouth; shock has frozen his heart. He is dead.

Total time elapsed: 7/10ths of a second!